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20121128
20121206
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
waving because of an impending decision at the united nations. i'll ask israel's ambassador to the united states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound du
opposed, 9. abstained, 41. >> the floor is to the secretary general of the united nations. >> mr. president, excellencies, ladies and gentleman, an important vote has taken place today in the general assembly. the decision [indiscernible] i stand ready to fulfill my role and report to this assembly, as requested in the resolution. my question has been consistent. the palestinians have a right to their own independent state. israel has the right to live in peace and security with its neighbors. there is no substitute for negotiations. today's vote underscores the urgency of meaningful negotiations. we must give a do impetus to ensure an independent democratic state of palestine lives with a secure state of israel. i urge the parties to renew their commitment for negotiating peace. i count on all to act responsibly, preserve your treatment in state building under the leadership of president abbas and the prime minister. thank you. [applause] >> i think the secretary-general of the united nations for a statement. >> we will break away from the united nations where they have approved
at the united nations to upgrade the palestinian authority status to nonmember observer state, full statehood still may be an allusive dream. with me to talk about his people's hopes and difficulties is palestinian prime minister salam fayyad. he's in washington to attend the 2012 saban forum on u.s./israel relations. it's my understanding you were against this at first. is that true? and if so, how do you feel now? >> no. i never was against it. as a matter of fact, i was very much a part of the thinking -- >> did you think it was time now? or some time down in the future? >> given the frustrations that we palestinians have had with the political process, it has not been productive. there's no question that we needed to pursue any and all available options to us. and the international law -- with the national diplomacy. and this was one of them. the question for me all along was how best to do it. provide us with some leverage going forward because what we really want end of day is genuine state where our people can live as free people with dignity. >> at the end we were just talking in the
of the united nations that president assad probably should not expect any mercy from his counterparts around the world. jonathan hunt has more on that from the united nations here in new york. jonathan, quite a debate about the asylum question for assad. and the question is the question is whether president bashar assad has taken the final decision to as he once said live and die in syria. if he does die, it's most likely to be, of course, at the hands of the rebels when they make their final push into the center of damascus, a push which most experts believe is coming. all whether president assad might now be willing to or trying to seek asylum in some friendly country. that would probably boil down to cuba, ecuador venezuela or russia. u.n. secretary general was asked about the asylum question today he did not seem to favor the idea. listen. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity whoever commits gross violation of human rights must be held accountable and should be brought to justice. >> that sentiment was echoed by officials at the u.s. state department who said there has to be
service. she's done a great job i think for us at the united nations. she's fought tirelessly for america's interests in very difficult times. when the united nations is a place where we often face significant challenges. and i understand that there was a lot of concern and anger initially about benghazi and about what happened and about the differences and reports but as this has been peeled back and more and more of the details have come out as best as i can make sense of it, the persistent criticism of her is that she represented the administration, went on talking -- went on different talk shows and went different radio shows and presented it based on intelligence she was given. this is far from the first time that a secretary of state u.n. ambassador has been given bad intelligence and repeated it publicly and why that makes her somehow unfit to serve as secretary of state is beyond me. in my view, if there's some unhappiness about the incidence in benghazi, some deep concern about security, there ought to be
nations envoy. the united states doesn't have a presidential envoy to deal with this crisis. these are low-cost solutions. having that kind of international peace process that brings pressure to bear on the parties, rwanda supporting the rebels, uganda supporting the process, the government is creating problems in the east as well. they need to be preshed into looking at the root causes since this cycle of violence began. >> is there anything that people can link sometimes, you have people who are suffering, wars taking place in that area. >> yeah. thanks for asking for that because the link between all of us who buy these products, like laptops and cell phones, and the violence is congo is very direct. it's sourced from the congo. so a major international effort has -- is under way just like the blood diamonds movement a decade and a half ago for sierra leonne and trying to drive that international market, that supply chain to be a more peaceful and legally developed. so that's really the objective. join up in some of those international efforts, go on raisehopeforco raisehopeforco raiseh
that appears on your screen. ♪ ♪ >> bret: secretary general of the united nations is the latest world leader to warn syria against using chemical weapons. there are indications tonight syria's embattled president may be working on an exit strategy. correspondent connor powell is watching from jerusalem. >> in the heart of damascus, syrian forces fire rockets on nearby rebel additions. the fighting moving closer to the assad regime headquarters. this comes as secretary of state hillary clinton today reiterated her warnings to syrian president bashar assad against using chemical weapons. once again, saying it would cross a red line. senior syrian official refused to confirm the existence of the weapons but denied the government is considering using them in the fight, despite intelligence reports to the contrary. >> our concerns are that increasingly desperate assad regime might turn to chemical weapons. or might lose criminal of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. >> groups according to the u.s. intelligence reports that are affiliated with al-qaeda. and are inc
as the united states is concerned. the president over at the national defense university was celebrating today. he was celebrating what was create a program to eliminate nuclear weapons that were a leftover after the collapse of the soviet union. the u.s. provides lots of money and experts to help with the job. the program's responsible for deactivating more than 7,000 nuclear warheads over the past two decades, in addition, some 900 intercontinental ballistic missiles and 6.5 million pounds of chemical weapons material have been destroyed thanks to the program. >>> hillary clinton has served president obama for four years as secretary of state. four years from now, could she be moving into her boss' office over at the white house? after this weekend, a lot more people are beginning to speculate about what hillary clinton is planning to do. our "strategy session," james carville and mary matlin, are both standing by live. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit m
free market economics you want talent and youth coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, rahmny, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how rahmny would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate rahmny was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what rahmny didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goaly. they just shot goals on him for four years and
coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, romney, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how romney would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate romney was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what romney didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goalie. they just shot goals on him for four years and some of them went through and some of them didn't a
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)